Vakamania!

Very soon, it’ll be time to dissect and reconstruct the boat (yikes!).  The part that needs the most work is the vaka, so I’ll start out making a list of items to check and do.  What’s a vaka, you ask?  Well, go to my Trimaran Anatomy 101 post, conveniently located at https://claritysailingadventures.wordpress.com/2010/06/02/trimaran-anatomy-101/ and you’ll get the picture.  Or the words, as there is no actual picture.

Let’s divide the vaka into 3 main parts, for which I’ll list what needs do be inspected/repaired/modified/prayed about.  These sections will be the Forward, Cockpit, and Aft sections.  I’ll work from front to back in each section, and try to complete the lists.  This might be kinda scary for me, as this will be the most complete list I’ve compiled, and I’m doing it right here for the first time.

And I’m out of beer.

FORWARD

Forepeak, showing existing deck beams and ring bulkhead

  1. Check bow eye fitting.  Repair fiberglass if needed, and decide if the single eye bolt needs to be replaced with a U-bolt
  2. Inspect the stemhead fitting, and the fiberglass the fitting is bolted to.  Reinforce the area under the gunnel, and consider using a turnbuckle to connect the underside of the stemhead fitting to the eyebolt (or U-bolt) on the bow.
  3. Decide whether or not to install a waterproof bulkhead about 2′ to 3′ aft of the bow.
  4. Inspect deck beams in vicinity of aka socket and mast step.  Install a bulkhead with weather tight access in this vicinity.
 

COCKPIT

Cockpit view

  1. Replace existing added on side decks with new plywood, preferably a nice marine ply with a teak and holly veneer (this is going to be the yachty touch to our otherwise workboat level finish).
  2. Build and install a daggerboard trunk in the existing centerboard slot.
  3. Build a daggerboard (possibly two, one intended as a shallow draft board) for use in the aforementioned trunk.
  4. Install a Whale Gusher bilge pump on a permanent mount somewhere in the cockpit, with an intake hose

    Another cockpit view

    long enough to get to the amas.  This could be a second hose.

  5. Check all eyestraps used for trampoline lacing for looseness, and damage to either the strap or the fiberglass.
  6. Design and install a cockpit sole.  This may be a watertight compartment, or simply removeable floorboards.  If the floorboards are removable, I’ll investigate the possibility of them filling up the cockpit opening in the new deck, thus making an area suitable for setting up a small tent.  Or a really small line dance.
  7. Decide if installing a bailer in the hull (Elvstrom style) is a good idea or not.  On the plus side, it sucks out water whenever the boat is doing a few knots.  On the negative side, it involves a

    Yet another cockpit view

    hole below the waterline!

  8. Install nets and/or bags for miscellaneous storage on each side of the cockpit, under the seats.
  9. Relocate the mainsheet.  This may involve installing a traveler either on the deck, or on the rear vaka.
 

AFT

Installing the rear deck hatch

  1. Check rear vaka socket, and repair if needed
  2. Install weather tight bulkhead under the deck, as close to the front edge as practical.
  3. Seal up bizarre hole from the bizarre motor mount somebody added earlier in Clarity’s life.
  4. Add a waterproof bulkhead forward of the deck plate that is already installed on the afterdeck.
  5. Replace the rear drain plug o-ring, or the assembly.  Recaulk it, and put actual nuts on the bolts that are holding it in place at the moment.

Well, that seems to be a good start to the list!  Not listed are fixing the scratches on the outside of the hull, checking it for damage along the keel line, and painting.  The next lists to be done will be for the akas, amas, rudder, mast, standing, and running rigging.  After that will be the equipment lists.

And I’m still out of beer.

Cockpit view from astern

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